L’Association Belgo-Palestinienne  en collaboration avec la Communauté Palestinienne en Belgique et au Luxembourg, Le Centre Culturel Arabe en Pays de Liège et le Comité Verviers Palestine, vous invite à participer le 1er décembre à Liège à la

Journée internationale  des Nations Unies pour la solidarité avec le peuple palestinien

 L’Organisation des Nations Unies a, en 1977, proclamé le 29 novembre, Journée internationale de solidarité avec le peuple palestinien  afin de marquer l’adoption en 1947 du Plan de partage de la Palestine et de mobiliser la communauté internationale en faveur de  l’exercice des droits inaliénables du peuple palestinien.

 Samedi  1er Décembre 2012  –  13h30 <  20h

 Espace Georges Truffaut – Avenue de Lille, 5 à 4020 Liège

 

Programme

 13h30 – Accueil

 14h : Liège 30 ans d’ABP !

Renée Mousset, co-fondatrice de l’ABP Liège – Liège, 30 ans de solidarité avec le peuple palestinien !

Pierre Galand, Président de l’ABP – Le Tribunal Russell sur la Palestine

Serge Hustache,  Député provincial de Hainaut  – Le jumelage entre les villes wallonnes & Palestiniennes

& Intervention de différentes personnalités politiques (Muriel Gerkens, Hassan Bousetta, Jean-Marie Schreuer)

 15h30 : « FASHION FOR PEACE » Fadila Aalouchi avec son défilé de mode aux couleurs de la Palestine!

Une première à Liège!         « A défaut que la paix soit une mode, la mode toutefois peut-être au service de la paix »

 Pause

 16h  : Pour une nouvelle reconstruction du projet national Palestinien !

Leila Shahid : Déléguée générale de Palestine auprès de l’UE, de la Belgique et du Luxembourg

Antoine Shalhat : écrivain et analyste politique

 Pause – stands – exposition – petite restauration

 19h :    « Dala’ona » : Troupe de danses folkloriques palestiniennes

 

 Entrée libre

Espace François Truffaut, Avenue de Lille 5, 4020 Liège

Info : 02/223 07 56 < www.association-belgo-palestinienne.be

 

 Avec le soutien de : CNCD, ULDP, FGTB/Liège-Huy-Waremme, Union Générale des Étudiants Palestiniens, le MOC, JOC 

Affiche

 

 

 

 

 

Eight days and sleepless nights elapsed with images of murdered and wounded children and civilians being posted over social media networks. “Gaza is under attack” was the first post I read on November 14th 2012 to confirm my expectations about an Israeli military operation in Gaza. When I knew that Israel dubbed this attack “Operation Pillar of Cloud,” I wondered about the “creativity” of the name but chose not to think much of the naming and focus instead on the destruction this operation was inflecting on my hometown. From the minute the operation started, I was glued on Al Jazeera’s live streaming. I refused to watch Western media outlets because they will just make me angrier. Each time Al Jazeera broadcasted a new bombardment, I closely examined the images with the fear to see remnants of my parents’ house in Gaza or the face of my father or my mother sticking out of the rubble. Yet, there was too much destruction to be able to tell the location these attacks and each time, I had to call my mother to make sure they are unharmed.

 

Although Israel justified the operation by self-defense, attacking someone’s house, schools, or even military is offensive. In the end, this conflict is not between Israel and Hamas or between Israel and Gaza only. In fact, the root cause of the developments in Gaza is the occupation that started with the creation of the state of Israel in 1948 and the displacement of some 771,000 Palestinians who lived, owned properties and had striving businesses of what is called Israel thereafter. Today, Gaza has a population of about 1.5 million, 1.1 (73.3%) of which are refugees who fled the 1948 and the 1967 wars with Israel. The majority of those refugees came from what is known now as Beer Sheva, Ashkelon, Tel Aviv, Sderot and other towns in the south of Israel. This means about 73.3% of the militants who launch rockets on Israel today originally come from the towns where the rockets land.

 

These fact seem to be regularly ignored and as usual, official western official commentaries continued to present Palestinians, and in this case Gaza, as equally powerful as Israel. Yes, Hamas has a militant wing but it does not even get to the level of a regular army. Hamas’s military wing in military term is a militia with simple arsenal. Israel on the other hand, has a cutting edge military that is ranked as one of the strongest militaries in the world. Israel is also one of the few world’s nuclear power. Thus the killing and destruction practiced by Israel and at its disposal cannot be compared to that of Hamas. Yet, more condemnations were directed to Gaza rockets rather than the usual excessive use of power by the occupier, Israel. These condemnations seemed to me as a Palestinian as a competition to who can show more loyalty to Israel and more marginalization of the Palestinians. In a sense in the western perception, the Palestinians (and particularly Hamas) and Israel are equally responsible but the Israeli occupation and Israel’s excessive military actions are not equally condemned as Palestinian militant activity.

 

Some argued that the Israeli PM, B. Netanyahu launched such operation to appeal for the voters in the upcoming elections in January 2013. Some even posted charts and tables about correlation between Israeli elections and several military operations in the Gaza Strip, the West Bank and Lebanon. The shocking thing is several times the parties who launched these operations were reelected.

 

Netanyahu’s “defensive” Operation Pillar of Cloud took the life of more than 160 Gazans, more than 50% of which are civilians, and 37 children. Israel blamed Hamas for the civilian deaths and claimed the killing of civilians as collateral damage although it demonstrated its capabilities to assassinate militants as they were driving their cars or motorcycles and even as they were in their office. Several Gaza critics of Hamas responded to the Israel accusations that Hamas used civilians as human shields and this is why so many civilians and children were killed. These critics confirmed that these accusations are baseless and Israel clearly bombed Gaza indiscriminately.

 

On November 20th 2012, Hamas and Israel approved a cease-fire agreement. The agreement left us in perplexity. Some thought the operation itself served Hamas’s interests rather than Israeli ones. Many Palestinians, including those affiliated with Fatah, expressed admiration of Hamas’s and Gaza’s steadfastness and saw in Gaza a symbol for the Palestinian suffering under occupation. After the second Palestinian Intifada, many rejected the idea of armed resistance against the Israeli occupation and defended non-violence. Hamas on the other hand, argued for all forms of resistance to occupation, including violence. Under Operation Pillar Cloud, Hamas’s rockets hit Tel Aviv and the outskirts of Jerusalem for the first time. Other sensitive targets in Israel, such as Eilat, were in the range. The fact that Hamas’s rockets appeared to push Israeli into a truce made Palestinians believe that violent resistance can be an option. This and Hamas’s capabilities to bear an extensive Israeli attack strengthened the former’s popularity.

 

Although many Palestinians and Israelis celebrated the end of the operation, they both are cautious about having too much hope. Both Hamas and Israel declared the cease-fire as its own victory: Israel by dealing a severe strike at its enemy, and Hamas by steadfasting hitting the heart of the Israeli proper. Israel signed up for stopping all military operations against Gaza, including assassinations, ease of crossings in and out of Gaza and lifting the six year-old Gaza Siege. Hamas on the other hand agreed to stop rocket fire on Israel. While relieved after eight days of severe tension, many Gazans question the value of the agreement. To them, this agreement required the death of more than 160 persons and left massive destruction while the truce will meet the same fate of previous cease-fires and won’t live for long.

 

With this perplexity, several observers believe that the cease-fire does not mean the end of the conflict, it does not mean there won’t be other Israeli operations and does not necessarily mean complete halt of Palestinian rockets. Living under this conflict, Israelis and Palestinians have come to realize that violence can be an endless cycle with the chicken and egg type of discussion on whom to blame. Palestinians know that Operation Pillar of Cloud can be a test for the capabilities of Gaza militants. For more than a year now, Israel has been marketing attacking Iran in the West. Israel knows that if it launches a war against Iran, there is a high chance to be hit by its Hamas allies in Gaza. Thus Israel wanted to test, how far Hamas rockets can go and how advanced they have become. In fact, many believe that Israel’s assassination of Ahamd Jabari at the beginning of this escalation was meant to add to the fire. A few hours before his assassination, Jabari received a draft of a permanent truce with Israel and was responsible for its implementation on Gaza’s southern borders. His assassination was explained as Israel’s lack of interest in actual peace in the area.

 

Additionally, Operation Pillar Cloud is the first wide Israeli offensive after the Arab Spring. The newly elected post-revolutionary regimes were also put to test. As the operation was going on, many were wondering whether these regimes will be any different from their predecessors. In the first few days, Mursi of Egypt sent a high-ranking delegation to Gaza. Tunisia followed suit a few days later and so did Turkey. Medical and other aids flooded from the three countries into Gaza as the Israeli operation was going on. Mursi promised that Gaza is not alone anymore and Egyptians marched to the Rafah borders, protesting the attack. Mursi also played a role in reaching a cease-fire.

 

While the region has witnessed a strategic change, this does not necessarily mean a military involvement against Israel by any country in the region. The new regimes will demonstrate more solidarity with the Palestinians but will leave the latter more perplexed about a more affirmative role for regional actors.

 

 

Par Salam Kawakibi, directeur adjoint de l’Arab Reform Initiative et Professeur associé à l’Université Paris 1. 

 

La relation du pouvoir syrien avec le tissu urbain n’a jamais cessé d’être conflictuelle. Elle se confirme par la destruction avec les bombardements massifs des villes anciennes comme récemment à Alep. Ses quartiers et ses monuments classés patrimoine mondial ont été des cibles privilégiées.

Ainsi, la corruption systémique qui précédait la révolution, et qui était une de ses raisons, avait toujours traité la mémoire collective avec mépris. Les dégâts perpétrés ces derniers mois dans les souks d’Alep, l’une des plus vieilles galeries commerciales au monde, ne peuvent qu’en être la démonstration extrême.

La bataille d’Alep n’est qu’un exemple d’une situation plus générale et traduit une impasse opérationnelle dans laquelle le pouvoir ainsi que l’opposition se trouvent.

La Syrie est en face d’un premier défi alarmant : une guerre contre les civils qui risque de se transformer en guerre civile. Après avoir développé tous les ingrédients par le pouvoir et avec la complicité active ou passive de la « communauté » internationale, un tel renversement de la situation ouvrira des spectres d’avenir plus complexes et plus incertains. Pour échapper à cela, le travail des forces de la société syrienne doit se renforcer d’une façon méthodologique bien avant le changement souhaité.

Dans cette logique, des projets élaborés par des intellectuels engagés, technocrates sensibilisés et activistes peuvent ouvrir des brèches d’espoir dans un ciel obscur. En guise d’exemple, The Day After[1], consiste à imaginer des scénarios pour l’après Assad et ouvre le débat sur la transition politique sous plusieurs chapitres. Ainsi, les efforts à construire des commissions de vérité dans le cadre de la justice transitionnelle peuvent rassurer un grand nombre de Syriens et les éloignent du désir revanchard.

Le deuxième défi est incarné par une situation humanitaire catastrophique qui ne cesse d’interpeller la conscience internationale endormie. Les déclarations et les bonnes intentions n’alimentent pas des affamés et elles n’abritent pas des refugiés. Les retombées néfastes d’une telle situation risquent d’avoir des impacts très profonds sur la société syrienne mais aussi sur les pays avoisinants.

A la sortie de cette crise, la Syrie atteindra un niveau économique catastrophique avec tout ce que cela peut engendrer au niveau sociétal. Dès lors, un plan « Marshall » est nécessaire et il doit avant tout s’appuyer sur la diaspora syrienne déjà engagée dans l’aide humanitaire ainsi que sur les donateurs étrangers.

La transition démocratique sera un long processus pour enrayer cinq décennies d’absence totale de pratique politique et pour remplacer la culture de la peur par un engagement citoyen. La façon avec laquelle les Syriens aboutiront à concrétiser la fin de la dictature sera déterminante pour l’issu du processus durant les années à venir.

Les chantiers seront énormes par leur nombre et leur dimension. La reconstruction du tissu social, qui a été méthodiquement fissuré, nécessitera un travail minutieux au sein d’une société civile émergeante. L’économie qui a été spoliée et corrompue durant des décennies aura besoin d’un plan rigoureux de restructuration nationale. Pour ce faire, il est inévitable de rassurer la société dans son ensemble par l’application d’une justice transitionnelle efficace et par une série de réformes dans plusieurs domaines comme la justice, la sécurité et les forces armées.

Dans ce processus, même si les intérêts prédominent et que les relations internationales ne fonctionnent pas avec une logique de charité et de principes moraux, l’implication des pays riches (pour ne plus dire la communauté internationale qui est un concept farfelu), est inévitable. Après une indifférence aigüe, et pour se racheter, ces pays pourront investir dans la reconstruction d’une Syrie dévastée.

Cependant, la spéculation sur l’implication étatique des pays occidentaux ne donne pas des perspectives réelles. Ce qui sera le plus proche de la réalité humaine, viendra de la société civile internationale qui, même si elle est à moitié silencieuse actuellement, elle se réveillera, espérons-le,  et s’impliquera plus dans le processus futur.

Finalement, les Syriens, et dès le premier jour, ont bien avalé le fait qu’ils aient été abandonnés et laissés à leur destin. C’est un constat crucial qui les aidera à surmonter tous les obstacles futurs. Car s’ils sont capables d’aboutir à leur liberté et à préserver la cohésion sociale fortement endommagée, le reste sera relativement accessible.

 



[1] http://www.thedayafter-sy.org/media/thedayafteren.pdf

 

 

Actions in The Mediterranean, l’Association des Démocrates tunisiens au Benelux, le Cercle du Libre Examen et l’Union des Anciens Etudiants de l’ULB, avec le soutien du Pôle Bernheim Paix et Citoyenneté et de l’Institut d’Etudes Européennes organisent la

conférence intitulée:

 

« La Tunisie, A la Croisée des Chemins »

«En présence de Maya Jribi, Seule femme leader d’un grand parti politique d’opposition »

 

La conférence aura lieu le lundi 3 décembre, à 20h, à l’auditoire 2215, au bâtiment H sur le campus du Solbosch de l’Université Libre de Bruxelles.

 

 

Actions in The Mediterranean, l’Association des Démocrates tunisiens au Benelux, le Cercle du Libre Examen et l’Union des Anciens Etudiants de l’ULB, avec le soutien du Pôle Bernheim Paix et Citoyenneté et de l’Institut d’Etudes Européennes organisent la

conférence intitulée:

 

« La Tunisie, A la Croisée des Chemins »

«En présence de Maya Jribi, Seule femme leader d’un grand parti politique d’opposition »

 

La conférence aura lieu le lundi 3 décembre, à 20h, à l’auditoire 2215, au bâtiment H sur le campus du Solbosch de l’Université Libre de Bruxelles.

 

 

As a member of the Anna Lindh Foundation MEDEA has conceived a project in the framework of the Common Actions of the ALF. This project aims to create new synergies and common strategies between the active members of the Belgian network. It offers the opportunity to meet participants with similar interests and consequently enlarging one’s network. Moreover we want to give all participating members the chance to collaborate within a common project. In a concrete way of speaking we want to create and put into practice a common project around the following themes: intercultural dialogue , youth, employment, (will be defined during our upcoming meetings), in accordance with the ALS goals.

So far we have had two meeting with a number of members of the Belgian network. During these meetings we reflect together on the themes, goals, vision, needs, target group, etc of our project. The purpose is that many more member organisations will join (members of the ALF) this project.

Our next meeting will be on December 21 from 9-13 o’clock at MEDEA, Square de Meeûs 24, 1000 Brussel. We kindly invite you for this meeting! The goal of this meeting is to define the action plan for our Common Action. For more information please don’t hesitate to contact us by email: m.goetinck(at)medea.be or by phone 02/231 13 00 or 0494/25  12  87.

Action Commune du réseau belge de la FAL, descriptif du projet et résultats des réunions

Weldra zal de MEDEA website ook in het Nederlands beschikbaar zijn. Indien u meer wilt lezen over onze Common Action in het Nederlands, gelieve dan dit document te openen.

Beschrijving Common Action van het Belgisch netwerk van de ALS

 

Analyse

Des « Pilier de défense » qui peuvent laisser perplexes

Par Dua Nakhala, assistante de recherches à l’Université Georges Washington

Cette analyse est une version étoffée de l’édito de la semaine

 

J’ai vécu huit jours et huit nuits blanches à regarder les terribles images de civils et d’enfants tués via la télévision et les réseaux sociaux.  « Gaza est attaquée ! » C’est le premier titre de la presse que j’ai lu, confirmant mes craintes le 14 novembre 2012 de voir une fois encore mon pays dévasté par une opération militaire israélienne à Gaza. Quand j’ai su qu’Israël avait entamé son opération, je me suis encore une fois demandé d’où lui venaient les appellations curieuses qu’ils donnent à leurs actions. Cette fois ci, c’était l’opération « Pilier de défense », après « Plomb durci » en décembre 2008. De la minute où l’opération a commencé, j’ai été collé à la télévision et à Al Jazeera en continu.

Lire la suite

 

Analyse

Par Dua Nakhala, assistante de recherches à l’Université Georges Washington

 

J’ai vécu huit jours et huit nuits blanches à regarder les terribles images de civils et d’enfants tués via la télévision et les réseaux sociaux. « Gaza est attaquée ! »  C’est le premier titre de la presse que j’ai lu, confirmant mes craintes le 14 novembre 2012 de voir une fois encore mon pays dévasté par une opération militaire israélienne à Gaza. Quand j’ai su qu’Israël avait entamé son opération, je me suis encore une fois demandé d’où lui venaient les appellations curieuses qu’ils donnent à leurs actions. Cette fois ci, c’était l’opération « Pilier de défense », après « Plomb durci » en décembre 2008. De la minute où l’opération a commencé, j’ai été collé à la télévision et à Al Jazeera en continu. J’ai refusé de regarder les médias occidentaux car souvent ils m’exaspèrent. Chaque fois que la télévision retransmettait un nouveau bombardement, je surveillais de près les images avec la crainte de voir les restes de la maison détruite de mes parents ou le visage de mon père ou ma mère tuméfié dans les décombres. Pourtant, il y avait bien trop de destructions pour pouvoir reconnaître avec certitude les lieux. Chaque fois, j’ai dû appeler ma mère pour m’assurer que mes parents étaient indemnes.

Bien qu’Israël ait justifié l’opération par l’autodéfense face au Hamas et aux roquettes, détruisant maisons, écoles, ou casernes militaires, j’avais le sentiment que ce conflit n’était plus entre Israël et le Hamas mais entre Israël et Gaza seulement. En fait, la cause première des développements dramatiques récents à Gaza est l’occupation qui a commencé dès la création de l’état d’Israël en 1948, la mort-née de l’Etat palestinien pourtant prévu par les Nations unies et le plan de partage voté le 29 novembre 1947 et le déplacement d’environ 771,000 Palestiniens.

Aujourd’hui, Gaza a une population d’environ 1.5 millions d’habitants sur un territoire de 350km2. Près de 1.1 millions (soit 73.3 %) sont les réfugiés qui se sont enfuis en 1948 d’Israël. La majorité de ces réfugiés est venue de ce qu’on connaît maintenant comme Beer Sheva, Ashkelon, Tel Aviv, ou Sderot et d’autres villes au sud d’Israël. Cela signifie qu’environ 73.3 % des militants qui lancent des roquettes sur Israël aujourd’hui viennent à l’origine des villes où elles atterrissent.

Certains ont soutenu que le premier Ministre israélien, Benjamin Netanyahu a lancé une telle opération pour séduire plus encore ses électeurs pour les prochaines élections législatives anticipées de janvier 2013. Certains diagrammes et analyses montrent qu’il y a toujours eu une corrélation entre l’approche d’élections israéliennes et le déclenchement de plusieurs opérations militaires à Gaza, en Cisjordanie, ou même au Liban. Et plusieurs fois, les partis qui ont lancé de telles opérations ont été réélu.

L’opération « Pilier de défense » de Netanyahu a couté la vie à plus de 160 Palestiniens et 5 Israéliens.  Plus de 50 % sont des civils et parmi eux, 37 enfants. Israël a blâmé le Hamas des morts de civils israéliens et a admis celle des civils palestiniens comme des dommages collatéraux.

Le 20 novembre dernier, le Hamas et Israël ont approuvé un accord de cessez-le-feu. L’accord nous a laissés dans une certaine perplexité. Certains ont pensé que l’opération elle-même avait servi les intérêts du Hamas plutôt que ceux des Israéliens. Beaucoup de Palestiniens, y compris ceux affiliés au Fatah, ont salué le courage du Hamas et présenté la situation à Gaza comme un symbole pour les Palestiniens souffrant sous l’occupation. Après la deuxième Intifada palestinienne, beaucoup ont rejeté l’idée de résistance armée contre l’occupation israélienne et ont défendu la non-violence. Le Hamas s’est donné lui toutes les formes possibles de résistance à l’occupation, y compris la violence. Pendant l’opération israélienne, les roquettes palestiniennes ont frappé pour la première fois Tel Aviv et la banlieue de Jérusalem. D’autres cibles sensibles en Israël, comme la station balnéaire sur la mer Rouge Eilat, étaient en ligne de mire. Du coup la violence a rapporté au Hamas et devient de nouveau une posture politique.

Bien que beaucoup de Palestiniens et d’Israéliens aient célébré la fin de l’opération, ils restent assez prudents. Tant le Hamas qu’Israël ont déclaré le cessez-le-feu comme leur propre victoire : Israël en ayant porté un coup sévère à son ennemi et le Hamas en frappant au cœur même d’Israël. Israël s’est engagé à arrêter toutes les opérations militaires contre Gaza, y compris les assassinats, promettant de faciliter la liberté de circulation de Gaza et alléger le blocus de Gaza. Le Hamas a d’autre part consenti à arrêter les tirs de roquettes sur Israël. S’ils sont soulagés, les Gazaouis se posent la question de l’intérêt à long terme d’un tel accord.

Avec perplexité, plusieurs observateurs restent persuadés que le cessez-le-feu ne signifie d’aucune manière la fin du conflit. Cela ne signifie pas qu’il n’y aura pas d’autres opérations israéliennes et ne veut pas nécessairement dire l’arrêt complet des roquettes palestiniennes. En vivant au cœur de ce conflit, Israéliens et des Palestiniens se rendent compte que la violence peut être un cycle infini. Les Palestiniens savent aussi l’opération « Pilier de défense » a pu être un test sur les capacités de résistance des habitants de Gaza afin d’envisager sérieusement une autre guerre. Depuis plus d’un an maintenant, Israël a médiatisé la potentialité d’une attaque de l’Iran. Israël sait que s’il lance une guerre contre l’Iran, il y a de forts risques pour lui d’être frappé par ses alliés du Hamas à Gaza. Ainsi Israël a voulu tester, jusqu’où les roquettes du Hamas peuvent aller.

De plus, l’opération « Pilier de Défense » est la première large offensive israélienne après le printemps arabe. Les régimes post-révolutionnaires nouvellement élus ont été aussi mis à l’épreuve. Pendant que l’opération se déroulait, beaucoup se demandaient si ces régimes seraient comme leurs prédécesseurs. Quelques jours après le début, le président Morsi a envoyé une délégation de haut rang à Gaza. La Tunisie a fait de même quelques jours plus tard et la Turquie de même. Des aides médicales ont été envoyées d’urgence à Gaza. Morsi a promis que les habitants de Gaza ne resteraient pas seuls et les Égyptiens ont manifesté au poste frontière de Rafah, protestant contre l’opération israélienne. Le Président égyptien a joué un rôle déterminant dans la signature de la trêve.

Tandis que la région a été témoin d’un changement géopolitique majeur, cela ne signifie pas nécessairement que davantage de pays vont se dresser face à Israël. Les nouveaux régimes démontreront en tout cas au moins probablement plus de solidarité avec les Palestiniens qu’ils ne le firent par le passé. C’est une première étape.

 

 

Comment témoigner à chaud de guerres, de révolutions ou de conflits ? Comment des artistes rendent-ils compte de violences subies à l’échelle d’un pays qui se révolte ?
Avec la Syrie, la question qui sous-tend le cycle « Mémoires contemporaines, du documentaire à la fiction » atteint une douloureuse pertinence. Nul recul historique n’est ici possible. Les écrivains et les artistes – photographes, cinéastes, caricaturistes, affichistes … – tout comme les anonymes qui partagent leurs photos et vidéos sont en première ligne. Leurs témoignages, leurs oeuvres sont une première réponse, contre le silence et l’oubli.
Pour montrer la créativité et l’inventivité des oeuvres nées au temps de la révolte syrienne et qui pour une large part sont disponibles sur internet, un montage vidéo de Hala Alabdalla sera projeté en avant première, accompagné de lectures et d’une improvisation musicale.

Programme

 

“Gaza is under attack” was the first post I read on November 14th 2012. Eight days elapsed with images of murdered children and civilians. Israel dubbed this attack “Operation Pillar of Cloud”. I was glued on Al Jazeera’s live streaming. Each time Al Jazeera broadcasted a new bombardment, I closely examined the images with the fear to see remnants of my parents’ house in Gaza or the face of my father or my mother sticking out of the rubble. Yet, there was too much destruction to be able to tell the location these attacks and each time, I had to call my mother to make sure they are unharmed.

Although Israel justified the operation by self-defense, attacking someone’s house, schools, or even military is offensive. In the end, the root cause of the developments in Gaza is the occupation of Palestine in 1948 and the displacement of some 771,000 Palestinians from what is called Israel thereafter. Today, Gaza has a population of about 1.5 million, 1.1 (73.3%) of which are refugees who fled the 1948 and the 1967 wars. The majority of those refugees came from what is known now south of Israel where Palestinian rockets land today.

Some argued that the Israeli PM, Netanyahu launched such operation to gain more votes in the upcoming elections in 2013. Netanyahu was not the first to do so and several Israeli parties who previously launched similar operations were reelected. Israel claimed the killing of more than 80 civilians 37 of which are children an error although it has the tools to accurately hit precise targets.

The cease-fire agreement reached on November 20th 2012 somewhat served Hamas’s interests. Many Palestinians expressed admiration of Hamas’s steadfastness and saw in Gaza a symbol for the Palestinian suffering under occupation. For the first time, Hamas’s rockets appeared to push Israeli into a truce, which strengthened Hamas’s popularity.

Although many Palestinians and Israelis celebrated the end of the operation, much caution remains. While relieved after severe tension, many Gazans question the value of the agreement. To them, having Israel sign up for lifting the Gaza siege took the life of more than 160 persons in one week and left massive destruction while they know the truce will not live long. Moreover, many Israelis and Palestinians realize that violence can be an endless cycle and Operation Pillar of Cloud can be nothing but a test for the capabilities of Gaza militants and for the post-revolutionary Arab regimes in case Israel launches a war against Iran.