By Chloé de Radzitzky

The hearings of Truth and Dignity Commission (TDC) started again on Saturday, December 17th. It occurred exactly six years after Mohamed Bouazizi’s immolation which launched the protest movement in Tunisia. Its purpose it to highlight the various human rights violations committed under Bourguiba and Ben Ali (1955-2013). This Commission covers cases of rape, torture… as well as corruption cases and economic crime. The first hearings had already started in November. It indicated the relaunching of a process of transitional justice subjected to controversy. Indeed, if the purpose of the Commission is to promote the national reconciliation, its work is regularly damaged by internal and external dynamics which come to question its range.

Nida Tounes’ victory in 2014 brought a first shock to the transitional justice’s process. This party includes vestiges from the old regimes which feel threatens by the work of the TDC. Some members declared that the process of justice had already been fulfilled in 2011 and in 2012. Consequently, they believe that Tunisia now need to move toward future[1]. This idea was also present in Essebsi’s rhetoric during his campaign. He declared “We must smile and be hopeful again and not talk of the past. »[2]. Moreover, An-Nahda has taken some distance from the process since its alliance with Nida Tounes. The party is afraid to be ejected from power as it happens with Islamist in Egypt. The partisans of the transitional justice process were frightened that this new political configuration would hinder the work the Commission by limiting its budget, reports Al Jazeera. If such a measure has not been denounced, the direction of the TDC has already declared that certain state employees made it difficult the access to presidential archives[3].

In addition to the unfriendly political context, the harsh economic situation in Tunisia also affects the work of the Commission. The State considers that the TDC’s competences regarding corruption hinder the economic revival of the country. In 2015, the government tried to limit this privilege by promoting economic reconciliation bill[4]. Its purpose is to improve the economic climate by allowing the Tunisians who have money to reinvest in their country[5]. It would allow individuals found guilty of these crimes to be totally forgiven for past mistakes in exchange for an economic compensation to the State. The detractors of this resolution believe that its adoption would betray the revolutionary expectations, and would imply that democracy protects thieves[6].

Internal problems also came to slow down and to discredit the work of the authority of the Truth and Dignity Commission. The first one concerns its low efficiency. Indeed, the newspaper Le Monde reported that on the 62 300 files, about twenty settled[7]. It is partially due to the multiple internal tensions in the TDC. Its Chair, Sihem Bensedrine is often criticized for her temperament, and on 15 initial members, six members resigned[8]. Sheis also accused of favoring files of Islamists. This controversy contributed to enhence polarization between Seculars and Islamists[9]. Nevertheless Kora Andrieu, a political philosopher specialized on transitional justice issues, recently declared that it was normal that there is a selection of certain symbolic cases. Furthermore, she adds:

Besides, it is simply false to say that in the first audiences of the TDC there were only Islamists: we have heard and seen left activists, Islamists, or mothers of wounded persons and martyrs of the trade union revolution. Insisting on the ascendancy of the Islamists equals to revive the propaganda of past[10]

According to the International Crisis Group, the IVD works in an unfavorable context. The harsh economic environment coupled with the security issues and the come back of old regimes seriously affected the public support. However, Tunisia is not the only country having met those kind of issues and nothing says that the process will fail. Furthermore, if compromises between the representatives of the State and the IVD are necessary, the preservation of the process of transitional justice remains essential for the future of the democracy in Tunisia. The shock which followed the first hearings demonstrates of the importance of the process. As declared it Sihem Bensedrine  »  » today, we hear a lot that under the Ancien Regime everything was good, that there was no terrorism, no unemployment (…) We are there to restore the truth. The majority of the Tunisians do not know what took place. « [11].The exposure of the crimes committed under Bourguiba and Ben Ali is thus essential to restore the truth; and to avoid the spreading of the hatred of the victims who can lead to the radicalism[12].

[1] International Crisis Group, 2016, Tunisie : Justice transitionnelle et lutte contre la corruption, Rapport Moyen-Orient et Afrique du Nord de Crisis Group N°168, p. 12

[2] Reidy, E., “Tunisia transitional justice faces obstacles”, Aljazeera, 1 janvier 2015, Consulté le 19/12/2016 sur http://www.aljazeera.com/news/middleeast/2014/12/tunisia-transitional-justice-face-obstacles-20141228112518476386.html

[3] Galtier M., « Tunisie la torture des années Ben ali au grand jour », Libération, 16 Novembre 2016, Consulté le 19/12/2016 sur http://www.liberation.fr/planete/2016/11/16/tunisie-la-torture-des-annees-ben-ali-au-grand-jour_1528882

[4] Jamaoui, A., « Tunisia : the dispute over the economic reconciliationbill », Nawaat, 1er novembre 2015,   Consulté le 19/12/2016 sur https://nawaat.org/portail/2015/11/01/tunisia-the-dispute-over-the-economic-reconciliation-bill/

[5] Pour plus d’information, voir rapport p22 du  rapport : International Crisis Group, 2016, Tunisie : Justice transitionnelle et lutte contre la corruption, Rapport Moyen-Orient et Afrique du Nord de Crisis Group N°168

[6]   Lynch, M., 2016, “Tunisia May Be Lost in Transition”, Carnegie, consulté le 19/12/2016 sur  http://carnegie-mec.org/diwan/64510

[7] Bobin, F.,  « La Tunisie confrontée à la mémoire de la dictature », Le Monde, 17 décembre 2016, consulté le 19/12/2016 sur http://www.lemonde.fr/afrique/article/2016/11/17/la-tunisie-confrontee-a-la-memoire-de-la-dictature_5032722_3212.html#8PRqmIwUQqlJGjAa.99 http://www.lemonde.fr/afrique/article/2016/11/17/la-tunisie-confrontee-a-la-memoire-de-la-dictature_5032722_3212.html#LM1qUjB1o7AtFCEQ.99

[8] Galtier M., « Tunisie la torture des années Ben ali au grand jour », Libération, 16 Novembre 2016, Consulté le 19/12/2016 sur http://www.liberation.fr/planete/2016/11/16/tunisie-la-torture-des-annees-ben-ali-au-grand-jour_1528882

[9] Interview Andrieu K., 2016, disponible sur  http://www.ivd.tn/fr/?p=923

[10] Interview Andrieu K., 2016, disponible sur  http://www.ivd.tn/fr/?p=923

[11] Galtier M., « Tunisie la torture des années Ben ali au grand jour », Libération, 16 Novembre 2016, Consulté le 19/12/2016 sur http://www.liberation.fr/planete/2016/11/16/tunisie-la-torture-des-annees-ben-ali-au-grand-jour_1528882

[12] International Crisis Group, 2016, Tunisie : Justice transitionnelle et lutte contre la corruption, Rapport Moyen-Orient et Afrique du Nord de Crisis Group N°168.

 

Par Chloé de Radzitzky 

 

Les auditions de l’Instance Vérité et Dignité ont repris le samedi 17 décembre, six ans jour pour jour après l’immolation de Mohamed Bouazizi qui avait lancé le mouvement de protestation en Tunisie. Cette instance a pour objectif de faire lumière sur les différentes violations des droits de l’homme perpétré sous Bourguiba et Ben Ali (1955-2013). Cette commission couvre non seulement les affaires d’homicides, des viols, de torture… mais aussi les affaires de corruption et de crime économique. Les premières auditions des victimes avaient déjà commencé en novembre, et signalaient la relance du processus de justice transitionnel très controversé. En effet, si le but de la Commission est de promouvoir la réconciliation nationale, son travail est régulièrement mis à mal  par des dynamiques internes et externes qui viennent questionner l’étendue même de ses compétences.

La victoire en 2014 du parti Nida Tounes est venue apporter un premier choc au processus de justice transitionnelle. Ce parti comprend des vestiges des anciennes dictatures qui peuvent se sentir menacer par le travail effectué par l’IVD. Certains ont même déclaré que le processus de justice avait déjà été mis en œuvre en 2011 et en 2012, et que la Tunisie avait maintenant besoin d’allé de l’avant[1]. Cette idée avait d’ailleurs déjà été exprimée lors de la campagne d’Essebsi lorsqu’il a déclaré « Nous devons sourire, espérer et ne plus parler du passé »[2]. Forcé de former une coalition avec Nida Tounes et de peur d’être éjecté du pouvoir (comme ce fut le cas, pour les islamistes en Egypte), le parti An-Nahda également a peu à peu pris des distances par rapport au processus de réconciliation. Les partisans du processus de justice transitionnelle ont été effrayé que cette nouvelle configuration politique ne vienne entraver le travail la Commission en limitant son budget, rapporte Aljazeera. Si aucune coupe budgétaire n’a été dénoncée, la direction de l’IVD a déjà déclaré que certains fonctionnaires ont rendu difficile l’accès aux archives présidentielles[3].

La situation économique difficile de la Tunisie affecte également le travail de la Commission. L’État considère que les compétences de l’IVD en matière de corruption entravent le processus de la relance économique. Le gouvernement a alors voulu en 2015 limiter cette prérogative en promouvant la réconciliation économique[4]. Le but de celle-ci est de promouvoir un climat économique favorable en permettant aux Tunisiens qui ont de l’argent de réinvestir dans leur pays[5]. Cela permettrait aux individus coupables de ces crimes d’être amnistiés totalement pour leurs erreurs passées en échange d’une compensation économique versée à l’État. Les détracteurs de cette résolution considèrent que son adoption trahirait les attentes révolutionnaires, et en viendrait à dire que la démocratie protège les voleurs[6].

Des problèmes internes sont également venus ralentir et décrédibiliser le travail de l’instance de Vérité et Dignité. Le premier concerne la faible efficacité de la Commission. En effet, le journal Le Monde rapporte que « sur les 62 300 dossiers de plainte dont elle a été saisie, une vingtaine seulement ont fait l’objet d’un règlement »[7]. Cela est en partie dû aux multiples tensions internes à l’IVD. Sa présidente Sihem Bensedrine est en effet souvent critiquée pour son tempérament, et sur les 15 membres initiaux, six membres ont démissionné[8]. Elle est aussi accusée de favoriser les dossiers des victimes Islamistes. Cette dernière controverse a contribué à accentuer la polarisation entre le publique séculaire et islamiste[9]. Pourtant, la philosophe politique Kora Andrieu, spécialiste des questions concernant la justice transitionnelle, a récemment déclaré qu’il était normal qu’il y ait une sélection de certains cas emblématiques. De plus, elle ajoute :

Par ailleurs, il est tout simplement faux de dire qu’aux premières audiences de l’IVD il n’y a eu que des islamistes : on a vu et entendu des militants de gauche, côte-à-côte avec les islamistes, justement, ou encore des mères de blessés et de martyrs de la révolution et des syndicalistes. Arguer de la prédominance des islamistes, c’est raviver ici encore la propagande du passé, un discours qui a habité le processus de justice transitionnelle tunisien depuis ses débuts, et qui a été en partie nourri par les programmes de réparations qui ont engendrés les pires rumeurs[10].

Selon l’ICG, l’IVD travaille dans un contexte qui lui est défavorable. Le contexte économique difficile couplé aux enjeux sécuritaires et au retour de certains vestiges du régime de Ben Ali en politique est sérieusement venu affecter le soutien du public. Pourtant, les problèmes rencontrés ne sont pas inédits à la Tunisie, et rien ne dit que le processus échouera. De plus, si des compromis entre les représentants de l’État et de l’IVD sont nécessaires, le maintien du processus de justice transitionnelle demeure essentiel pour l’avenir de la démocratie en Tunisie. Le choc qui a suivi première audition témoigne de la nécessité du processus. Comme le déclarait Sihem Bensedrine « «Aujourd’hui, on entend beaucoup que sous l’Ancien régime tout était bien, qu’il n’y avait pas de terrorisme, pas de chômage (…) Nous sommes là pour rétablir la vérité. La majorité des Tunisiens ne savent pas ce qui se passait. »[11].  L’exposition des crimes perpétrés sous Bourguiba et Ben Ali est donc essentielle pour rétablir la vérité ; ainsi que pour éviter une propagation de la haine des victimes pouvant mener à la radicalisation[12] .

Sources

[1] International Crisis Group, 2016, Tunisie : Justice transitionnelle et lutte contre la corruption, Rapport Moyen-Orient et Afrique du Nord de Crisis Group N°168, p. 12

[2] Reidy, E., “Tunisia transitional justice faces obstacles”, Aljazeera, 1 janvier 2015, Consulté le 19/12/2016 sur http://www.aljazeera.com/news/middleeast/2014/12/tunisia-transitional-justice-face-obstacles-20141228112518476386.html

[3] Galtier M., « Tunisie la torture des années Ben ali au grand jour », Libération, 16 Novembre 2016, Consulté le 19/12/2016 sur http://www.liberation.fr/planete/2016/11/16/tunisie-la-torture-des-annees-ben-ali-au-grand-jour_1528882

[4]Jamaoui, A. «  https://nawaat.org/portail/2015/11/01/tunisia-the-dispute-over-the-economic-reconciliation-bill/

[5] Pour plus d’information, voir rapport p22 du  rapport : International Crisis Group, 2016, Tunisie : Justice transitionnelle et lutte contre la corruption, Rapport Moyen-Orient et Afrique du Nord de Crisis Group N°168

[6] Lynch, M., 2016, “Tunisia May Be Lost in Transition”, Carnegie, consulté le 19/12/2016 sur  http://carnegie-mec.org/diwan/64510

[7]Bobin, F.,  « La Tunisie confrontée à la mémoire de la dictature », Le Monde, 17 décembre 2016, consulté le 19/12/2016 sur http://www.lemonde.fr/afrique/article/2016/11/17/la-tunisie-confrontee-a-la-memoire-de-la-dictature_5032722_3212.html#8PRqmIwUQqlJGjAa.99 http://www.lemonde.fr/afrique/article/2016/11/17/la-tunisie-confrontee-a-la-memoire-de-la-dictature_5032722_3212.html#LM1qUjB1o7AtFCEQ.99

[8] Galtier M., « Tunisie la torture des années Ben ali au grand jour », Libération, 16 Novembre 2016, Consulté le 19/12/2016 sur http://www.liberation.fr/planete/2016/11/16/tunisie-la-torture-des-annees-ben-ali-au-grand-jour_1528882

[9] Interview Andrieu K., 2016, disponible sur  http://www.ivd.tn/fr/?p=923

[10] Interview Andrieu K., 2016, disponible sur  http://www.ivd.tn/fr/?p=923

[11] Galtier M., « Tunisie la torture des années Ben ali au grand jour », Libération, 16 Novembre 2016, Consulté le 19/12/2016 sur http://www.liberation.fr/planete/2016/11/16/tunisie-la-torture-des-annees-ben-ali-au-grand-jour_1528882

[12] International Crisis Group, 2016, Tunisie : Justice transitionnelle et lutte contre la corruption, Rapport Moyen-Orient et Afrique du Nord de Crisis Group N°168.

 

How Damas lost Palmyra again-L’Orient le Jour-12/12/2016

The terrorist organization Islamic State managed to reconquer Palmyra 9 months after their expulsion from the city. This defeat of the Syrian army highlights, according to the newspaper “l’Orient le Jour”, the intrinsic weaknesses of the governmental forces. It was indeed unable to maintain the control of the territory without the Russian and Iranian support.

Islamic State claims responsibility for Cairo church bombing-The Guardian-13/12/2016

The Islamic State claimed the suicide attack which made twenty five deaths in a Coptic church of Cairo. The interior ministry declared that the initiator of this act of terror belonged to an Egyptian terrorist cell financed by the Muslims Brotherhood. The organization has nevertheless condemned the act.

Yemen conflict: US cuts arms sales to Saudi Arabia-BBC News-14/12/2016

Washington made the decision to decrease arms sales to the Saudis. This decision has been taken following the numbers of civil victims caused by the Saudi airstrike’s in Yemen. However, the United States asserted that they would continue supporting Saudi Arabia for what concerns intelligence and border controls.

Eastern-Aleppo: the evacuation has begun-le Figaro-15/12/2016

An agreement authorizing the evacuation of Aleppo was signed this night by 2:30 am. Approximately 15.000 people would try to leave the city. The operations began under the supervision of the Syrian governmental forces. The agreement states that in exchange, rebels have to allow the evacuation of the wounded persons blocked in two Shiite villages besieged since 2015.

Drug tests on foreigners marrying Saudi women-Middle East Monitor-16/12/2016

Arab news has recently reported that drug test would be made compulsory for foreigners intending to marry Saudi women. The Health Minister added this control to other medical tests having to be taken before a foreigner seeks to marry a Saudi woman. This measure has been set up while the Ministry of Justice revealed that statistics indicated an increase in marriage contracts between foreigners and nationals.

 

Comment Damas a une nouvelle fois perdu Palmyre-L’Orient le Jour-12/12/2016

L’organisation terroriste État Islamique a réussi à reconquérir la ville de Palmyre seulement 9 mois après y avoir été expulsé. Cette défaite de l’armée syrienne témoigne, selon le journal l’Orient le jour, des faiblesses intrinsèques de l’armée syrienne. Celle-ci fut en effet incapable de maintenir le contrôle du territoire sans l’aide Russe et Iranienne.

L’Etat Islamique revendique l’attentat du Caire-The Guardian-13/12/2016

L’État islamique a revendiqué l’attentat-suicide qui a fait vingt-cinq morts dans une église Copte du Caire. Le ministre de l’Intérieur a déclaré que l’initiateur de cet acte de terreur appartenait à une cellule terroriste égyptienne financée par les Frères Musulmans. L’organisation a néanmoins condamné l’acte.

Le conflit au Yémen: Les Etats-Unis diminuent les ventes destinées à l’Arabie Saoudite-BBC News-14/12/2016

Washington a pris la décision de diminuer les ventes d’armes aux Saoudiens. Elle a été prise suite aux nombres de victimes civiles provoquées par les raids aériens du pays au Yémen. Cependant, Les États-Unis ont affirmé qu’ils continueraient à soutenir l’Arabie Saoudite en ce qui concerne l’intelligence et le contrôle des frontières.

Alep-Est : les premiers évacués quittent les quartiers rebelles-le Figaro-15/12/2016

Un accord autorisant l’évacuation de la ville d’Alep a été signé cette nuit vers 2h30. Environ 15.000 personnes chercheraient à quitter la partie Est de la ville. Les opérations ont commencé sous la supervision des forces gouvernementales syrienne. L’accord prévoit en échange l’évacuation des blessés bloqués dans deux villages chiites assiégés depuis 2015.

Contrôle anti-drogue pour les étrangers ayant l’intention d’épouser une femme saoudienne-Middle East Monitor-16/12/2016

Le journal Arab news a récemment rapporté qu’un contrôle antidrogue serait rendu obligatoire pour les étrangers ayant l’intention d’épouser une Saoudienne. Cette mesure a été ajoutée par le ministre de la Santé aux autres examens médicaux devant être réalisée avant le mariage. Cette mesure a été mise en place alors que le ministère de la Justice révélait que les statistiques indiquaient une hausse dans les mariages entre étrangers et nationaux.

 

BETHLEHEM, WEST BANK- Fireworks display marking the lighting of a Christmas tree at the Manger Square near the Church of the Nativity Middle East Monitor

 

by Chloé de Radzitzky

The Turkish Parliament discussed on Saturday morning the possibility of reforming the Constitution by referendum. The project of President Erdogan and of his political party (AKP) is to change the parliamentary system in a presidential system « just like in France or in the United States « . In the hypothesis where this change would actually happen, Erdogan could legally remain in power until 2029; as well as strengthening its presidential powers[1].

To do it, they need to obtain 330 voices on 550 to the Parliament. The political Party AKP has strongly pushed for the project during the legislative election, asking to the Turkish electorate to give it enough seats to take the constitutional reform to a referendum. However, the AKP has only obtained 317 seats. A recent union with the MHP, the far-right Nationalist Movement Party, allowed Erdogan to make a step further towards the implementation of a hyper-presidential system. The date of the referendum is to be set in March/April, 2017[2]. But what are the implications of such changes?

The current Turkish parliamentary system gives the executive power to the Prime Minister. The function of president is more honorific[3]. The later one is supposed to abandon partisan memberships once elected. However, this trend has been de facto different since the election of president Erdogan in 2014. The project of reform of the constitution aims at institutionalizing it.

It is not the first time that the possibility of transforming the Turkish regime into a presidential system provokes debate. Ozal and Demirel (former prime ministers that both became president) also militated for a strengthening of the presidential powers starting from the 1980s[4]. Erdogan and his party took over the project for the first time in 2013 by proposing it to the « Commission for a constitutional consensus « . Partisans for reform support that ending coalition government will bring more stability in Turkey. Erdogan also asserted that it will give to the country the opportunity to develop more quickly weakening the check and balance system.

The partisans of the constitutional reform their project present as aiming at establishing a diet comparable to that of the United States. The American presidential system is characterized by a strong separation of powers. The legislative, executive and judiciary branches are subjected to a system of check and balance. Nevertheless, Erdogan asserted that he wants “a Turkish type of presidentialism”. He wants to establish a system corresponding to what Larkin defines as being a drift to “hyper-presidentialism ». Hyper presidentialism is defined by the author as being a radical version of the presidential system. He is characterized by a weakening of the system of balance of the powers resulting from an action of the president to change the diet and concentrate the power between his/her hands[5].

The reforms moved forward by the AKP in 2013 aim at abolishing the position of Prime Minister and to considerably increase the presidential legislative and the non-legislative powers. According to Boyunsuz, these changes taken in an independent way, are not unprecedented to the existing various forms presidential system. As the author writes it in his « The AKP’s proposal for a ‘Turkish type of presidentialism’ in comparative context »[6], it is the overall combination of these measures that put the Turkish type presidentialism in the category of “hyper-presidentialism”. The legislative powers enounced in the draft of the Constitution include, among others a right of veto combined with the ability to emit two types of decree (the capacity to establish a state of emergency and the ability to implement policies in areas where there is no clear legislation). The president can also submit legislative acts to a referendum once a year. If the constitutional reform takes place, Erdogan will also benefit from enormous non-legislative powers. For instance, by opposition to the president of the United States, he can appoint and dismiss Ministers and bureaucrats without any intervention of the legislative power[7].

This concentration of power in the hands of a president having already seriously limited the freedoms of the press and expression represents a serious threat for the democracy (although all this remains legal). However, it does not go against the trajectory that Tukey has already taken since few years. Erdogan has already proclaimed the state of emergency further to the attempt of coup d’état last July and Prime Minister already became a puppet.

References

[1] “Turquie: le renforcement des pouvoirs d’Erdogan soumis au Parlement”, La Libre Belgique, 10 décembre 2016. En ligne http://www.lalibre.be/dernieres-depeches/afp/turquie-le-renforcement-des-pouvoirs-d-erdogan-soumis-au-parlement-584c46b6cd70bb41f08e2d30

[2] Jégo, M 2016, En Turquie, vers un référendum en 2017 pour ou contre le renforcement des pouvoirs d’Erdogan”, Le Monde, 10 décembre 2016. En ligne http://www.lemonde.fr/proche-orient/article/2016/12/10/erdogan-veut-un-referendum-en-2017-pour-renforcer-ses-pouvoirs_5046833_3218.html

[3] Despite the fact that the President has some power since the 1982 Constitution

[4] Aygün, E 2014, ‘Presidentialism: is it a better option for Turkey?’, European Journal Of Economic And Political Studies (EJEPS), 7, i, pp. 71-85, Index Islamicus, EBSCOhost, viewed 13 December 2016.

[5] Özsoy Boyunsuz, Ş 2016, ‘The AKP’S proposal for a “Turkish type of presidentialism” in comparative context’, Turkish Studies, 17, 1, pp. 68-90, Academic Search Premier, EBSCOhost, viewed 13 December 2016

[6] Özsoy Boyunsuz, Ş 2016, ‘The AKP’S proposal for a “Turkish type of presidentialism” in comparative context’, Turkish Studies, 17, 1, pp. 68-90, Academic Search Premier, EBSCOhost, viewed 13 December 2016

[7] Özsoy Boyunsuz, Ş 2016, ‘The AKP’S proposal for a “Turkish type of presidentialism” in comparative context’, Turkish Studies, 17, 1, pp. 68-90, Academic Search Premier, EBSCOhost, viewed 13 December 2016

 

Par Chloé de Radzitzky

Le Parlement turc a discuté samedi matin de la possibilité de réformer la Constitution par référendum. Le projet du Président Erdogan et de son parti politique (AKP) est de changer le régime parlementaire en un régime présidentiel « tout comme en France ou aux États-Unis ». Dans l’hypothèse où ce changement aurait effectivement lieu, Erdogan pourrait rester légalement au pouvoir jusqu’en 2029 et renforcer considérablement ses pouvoirs en tant que président[1].

Pour ce faire, ils ont besoin d’obtenir 330 voix sur 550 au Parlement . L’AKP fortement mis ce projet en avant lors des élections législatives, demandant à l’électorat turc de lui accorder le nombre de sièges nécessaires pour demander la réforme par référendum. Les efforts du Parti ne furent cependant pas suffisants ; et l’AKP n’a obtenu que 317 sièges. Cependant, une récente union avec le MHP, le parti de la droite nationaliste, a permis à Erdogan de faire un pas de plus vers la mise en place d’une super-présidence et de fixer la date du référendum à mars/avril 2017

Le système parlementaire turc actuel donne le pouvoir exécutif au Premier ministre et un rôle qualifié de plus honorifique au président[3]. Celui-ci n’est pas censé garder d’affiliations partisanes une fois élu. Cette tendance est cependant de facto différente depuis l’élection du président Erdogan au suffrage universel en 2014 et le projet de réforme de la constitution a pour but de l’institutionnaliser.

Ce n’est pas la première fois que la possibilité de transformer le régime turc en un régime présidentiel fait débat. Ozal et Demirel (anciens premiers ministres tous deux devenus président) ont également milité pour un renforcement des pouvoirs du président à partir des années 1980[4]. Erdogan et son parti s’y étaient par la suite attelés une première fois en 2013 en proposant leur projet au sein de la « Commission pour un consensus constitutionnel ». L’argument des partisans de la réforme soutiennent que la fin des gouvernements de coalition amènera plus de stabilité en Turquie. Erdogan a également affirmé que cela donnera au pays l’opportunité de se développer plus rapidement  en allégeant les contraintes du système de la séparation des pouvoirs sur le gouvernement[5].

Les partisans de la réforme constitutionnelle présentent leur projet comme ayant pour but d’instaurer un régime comparable à celui des États-Unis. Le système présidentiel américain est caractérisé par une forte séparation des pouvoirs qui est en compétition pour le pouvoir et se contrôlent mutuellement. Néanmoins, Erdogan a affirmé que le régime présidentiel serait « à la turque ». Celui-ci met en place un système correspondant à ce que Larkin définit comme étant une « dérive hyper-présidentiel ». L’hyper présidentialisme est défini par l’auteur comme étant une version radicale du régime présidentiel. Il est caractérisé par un affaiblissement du système de séparation des pouvoirs résultant d’une action du président pour changer le régime et concentrer le pouvoir entre ses mains [6].

Les réformes avancées par l’AKP en 2013 visaient à abolir la position de premier ministre ainsi qu’ à augmenter les pouvoirs législatifs et non législatifs du président . Ces changements pris de manière indépendante ne représentent pas selon Boyunsuz quelque chose d’inédit et étranger aux autres systèmes présidentiels présents dans le monde. Comme l’auteur l’écrit dans son texte « The AKP’s proposal for a ‘Turkish type of presidentialism’ in comparative context »[7], c’est la combinaison de ces mesures qui fait basculer le régime présidentiel « à la turque » dans l’hyperprésidentialisme. Les pouvoirs législatifs proposés dans le brouillon de la Constitution en 2013 du président comprennent entre autres un droit de veto combiné au pouvoir d’émettre deux types de décret.  Le premier type de lui permet de décréter l’état d’urgence tandis que l’autre octroie au président le pouvoir d’implémenter des politiques dans les matières où il n’y pas de disposition législative claire. Le président pourra également soumettre une fois par an des actes législatif au référendum. Dans l’hypothèse où la réforme constitutionnelle ait lieu, Erdogan bénéficiera également d’énormes pouvoirs non législatifs. Contrairement au président des États-Unis, il pourra par exemple nommer et révoquer les ministres ainsi que les bureaucrates sans intervention du pouvoir législatif[8] .

Cette concentration de pouvoir entre les mains d’un président ayant déjà sérieusement limité les libertés de la presse et d’expression représente une sérieuse menace pour la démocratie (bien que tout cela reste légal). Cela n’entre cependant pas en contradiction avec la trajectoire qu’a prise la Turquie depuis quelques années. Erdogan a déjà proclamé l’état d’urgence suite à la tentative de coup d’état en juillet dernier et le premier ministre est déjà devenu une figure fantoche.

 

Références

[1] “Turquie: le renforcement des pouvoirs d’Erdogan soumis au Parlement”, La Libre Belgique, 10 décembre 2016. En ligne http://www.lalibre.be/dernieres-depeches/afp/turquie-le-renforcement-des-pouvoirs-d-erdogan-soumis-au-parlement-584c46b6cd70bb41f08e2d30

 

[2] Jégo, M 2016, En Turquie, vers un référendum en 2017 pour ou contre le renforcement des pouvoirs d’Erdogan”, Le Monde, 10 décembre 2016. En ligne http://www.lemonde.fr/proche-orient/article/2016/12/10/erdogan-veut-un-referendum-en-2017-pour-renforcer-ses-pouvoirs_5046833_3218.html

[3] Bien que le président ait quelque pouvoir depuis la Constitution de 1982

[4] Aygün, E 2014, ‘Presidentialism: is it a better option for Turkey?’, European Journal Of Economic And Political Studies (EJEPS), 7, i, pp. 71-85, Index Islamicus, EBSCOhost, viewed 13 December 2016.

[5] “Tensions flare as Turkey heads for referendum on new powers for President Erdogan as dissent crackdown continues”, the Independent, 14th of November 2016. Online on http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/turkey-president-recep-tayyip-erdogan-referendum-new-powers-tensions-flare-a7415951.html

[6]Özsoy Boyunsuz, Ş 2016, ‘The AKP’S proposal for a “Turkish type of presidentialism” in comparative context’, Turkish Studies, 17, 1, pp. 68-90, Academic Search Premier, EBSCOhost, viewed 13 December 2016

[7] Özsoy Boyunsuz, Ş 2016, ‘The AKP’S proposal for a “Turkish type of presidentialism” in comparative context’, Turkish Studies, 17, 1, pp. 68-90, Academic Search Premier, EBSCOhost, viewed 13 December 2016

[8] Özsoy Boyunsuz, Ş 2016, ‘The AKP’S proposal for a “Turkish type of presidentialism” in comparative context’, Turkish Studies, 17, 1, pp. 68-90, Academic Search Premier, EBSCOhost, viewed 13 December 2016

 

 

Press Review

This week, in the press review: »Daesh lost Sirte, its fief in Libya », »Saudi Court Orders Executions for 15 Accused of Spying for Iran », »In Aleppo, the rebellion loses ground every hours », »Religious leaders push for Muslim alternative to Peppa Pig » and « How one woman is standing up to Turkey’s purges ».

Read more

 

Daesh lost Sirte, its fief in Libya-Le Monde-5/12/16

The Libyan government of National Union regained control over the city of Sirte on Monday. It was the fief of the Islamic State in Libya. It is about a new backhand for the terrorist organization which is experiencing several setbacks in Iraq and in Syria nowadays.

Saudi Court Orders Executions for 15 Accused of Spying for Iran-The New-York Times-6/12/16

Saudi Arabia judged thirty two men accused of having spied  the country for Iran. Fifteen men were sentenced to death, fifteen others to a jail sentence. Only two were acquitted. A majority of them were of Shiite, and the Saudi media declare that some of them are the former employees of the Ministries of the Interior and the Defense. Several international organizations qualified this trial of parody of justice.

In Aleppo, the rebellion loses ground every hours-Liberation-7/12/2016

On Wednesday, the Syrian army has retaken the historic center of the city of Aleppo, as well as several districts. With this victory, Bachar Al Assad managed to reconquer 80 % of the territories which escaped its control since the summer 2012. The military Council of Aleppo proposed a humanitarian truce of five days to evacuate the civilians and the medical emergencies. Russia ignored this option and imposed, in the wake, its nth veto on a Security Council Resolution.

Religious leaders push for Muslim alternative to Peppa Pig-BBC-8/12/2016

The Australian National Imam Council encourages parents to collect funds to create television series corresponding to the Islamic values. A cartoon Barakah hills is presented as being an alternative to Peppa the pig for the youngest ones. The argument of president of the Australian National Imam Council is to give choice to the parents in what their kids are watching by proposing them a greater diversity of TV shows.

How one woman is standing up to Turkey’s purges-Al-Monitor-9/12/2016

Nuriye Gulmen is a Turkish academician who lost her post during the purge following the attempt of coup d’état of last July 15th. Since November 9th, she regularly goes near the Human Rights monument in Ankara to protest both against the state of emergency and for having her job back. She keeps going despite having been arrested 17 times. She has also received mistreatments from the police. Her resilience at a time where protests become rare makes her an iconic figure of resistance in Turkey.

 

Revue de Presse

Cette semaine dans la revue de presse: « Daesh a perdu Syrte, son fief en Libye », »Une court saoudienne a condamné à mort 15 hommes pour espionnage pour le compte de l’Iran », »A Alep, la rébellion perd du terrain d’heure en heure », »Les chefs religieux poussent pour une alternative musulmane à Peppa le cochon »et « Comment une femme se dresse contre les purges en Turquie ».

En lire plus