HERZOG, Chaïm

Israeli politician born in Ireland in 1915, son of the Chief Rabbi of Ireland (1921-1936) and later of Palestine (1936-1948). He studied law in Palestine and later at London and Cambridge. He was member of the Haganah from 1936, served in the British army in Europe during W.W. II. Head of British Intelligence in Northern Germany at the end of the war 1948 to 1950, and 1959 to 1962, head of Israeli military intelligence, while at the same time occupying several military leadership posts.

He returned to civilian life in 1962. He became military commentator for Israeli radio in 1967, and then military governor of the West Bank and Jerusalem.

He was appointed Israeli representative to the United Nations (1975 to 1978), and later became a member of the bureau of the Labour Party. Member of the Knesset from 1981 until 1983 when he was elected President of the State of Israel.

After his pardoning in 1986 of eleven secret service officers sentenced for their involvement in the assassination of a Palestinian suspect (Shabak affair), his repeated use of his power to pardon stirred controversy.

Chaïm Herzog died on 17 April 1997.